SOLVING ANALOG OBSOLESCENCE, THE EMULATION APPROACH

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The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and the Advanced Microcircuit Emulation Program (AME) of SRI International is in the process of studying foundational technology for analog base arrays.

A NUMBER OF TEST ARRAYS TARGETING DIFFERENT PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES WERE DESIGNED

The goal of which was to fabricate, assemble, test and use this information to build and optimize a production array suitable of being QML certified. Three types test arrays were developed in one reticle. Each array included different transistor variations (NPN, PNP, NMOS, PMOS) and circuit elements (diodes, resistors, capacitors, etc.). The BiCMOS array also targeted +20V Op Amps. The bipolar array allowed us to address other analog functions. The closed-cell (annular) transistor CMOS array allowed us to examine radiation-hardening-by-process (RHBP) techniques. Measurements were collected for all arrays and all devices. Through a iterative optimization process, we have started to narrow in on future production array and define a generic analog cell library and models.

WE PLAN TO COMPLETE DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIRST +20V ANALOG BASE ARRAY IN THE LATE 2018 TIME FRAME.

Initially we will target a +20V BiCMOS on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) array for production, optimized for Op Amps and other analog functions. The “+20V” implies an absolute differential supply between the most positive and most negative terminals of the part. In Op Amp parlance, this might be a +12V single supply op amp or a +/- 8V Op Amp, etc.. Op Amps were prioritized based on demand as they are one of the most common linear building blocks in analog electronics. A BiCMOS process was selected as it combines both bipolar and CMOS technologies on the same device and allows us to take advantage of the inherent benefits of each technology and offers the greatest flexibility to address a number of different Op Amp types.

We plan to complete development of the first +20V analog base array in the late 2018 timeframe. Beyond this, the AME program is evaluating new technology extensions (higher voltages and different analog functions), in our continuing efforts to support the War Fighter. Establishing this new manufacturing source for analog microcircuits will provide a cost-effective, long-term solution that provides total life cycle support for weapons systems, averting mission-impaired-capability-awaiting -parts (MICAP) incidence, production shutdowns, and maintaining weapon system readiness levels.